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Description:

This is a bundled training package. It contains training for each of the bundled items below:

Course Price
Introduction to Designing a Relational Database $74.95
The Logical and Physical Database Design Methodologies $74.95
Database Systems and Relational Databases $74.95
Management of Relational Database Data $74.95

Bundle Price: $169.00
Total Savings: $130.80


Introduction to Designing a Relational Database

Database design is an important process for creating databases. In an organization, the process sets the foundation for good database implementation and ensures that everything required for the business is provided. It also ensures that the database will perform as expected for the users. This course discusses what database modeling is and how it is used to aid database design. This course also describes the four steps in the database design life cycle, which are: requirements gathering and analysis, conceptual database design, logical database design, and physical database design. In addition, this course describes how to complete the first two steps in the database design life cycle – gathering and analyzing business requirements and developing the conceptual database design.
  • recognize how to use data modeling to represent real-world concepts
  • match each schema of the three-schema database architecture with its correct description
  • match the four steps in the database design life cycle with their correct descriptions
  • describe the process of relational database design
  • recognize the four steps in the database design life cycle.
  • recognize how to analyze requirements for database design
  • plan an interview
  • conduct an interview
  • record and analyze data
  • describe how to generate a conceptual Entity-Relationship Diagram or ERD
  • analyze requirements for database design
  • recognize how to gather business requirements
  • recognize how to generate a conceptual Entity-Relationship Diagram or ERD

The Logical and Physical Database Design Methodologies

When designing a database – after the requirements are gathered from the organization and the conceptual ERD has been approved – the logical design, and then the physical design can be completed. The logical design consists of taking the conceptual diagram and converting it to represent the logical implementation of the database; this includes identifying the entities, attributes, and the relationships that will exist. This also includes normalizing the database to remove redundant information. After the logical database design, the physical database needs to be implemented. Implementing the physical design includes actually creating the tables, determining the columns and their specifications, and determining indexes and views. This course discusses how to complete the logical database design and how to implement the physical database design.
  • define entities for ERD modeling
  • define attributes for ERD modeling
  • recognize how to model relationships in the ERD
  • describe the advanced types of relationships you may need to model in the ERD
  • define normalization and describe how to apply it to the ER model
  • develop an initial logical database design using simple E-R modeling techniques
  • develop a complete logical database design using advanced E-R modeling techniques
  • determine the tables and the column specifications
  • recognize how to create views and indexes
  • describe partitioning and clustering
  • recognize how to denormalize the design
  • implement the physical database design

Database Systems and Relational Databases

A database is used by organizations to store their data, and allow their employees to access, update, and manage it. Organizations use a Database Management System, also known as a DBMS to control, store, organization and retrieve that data for the users through end-user applications. There are multiple types of database, such as flat-file, network, and hierarchical. The most widely used database is the relational database, which is based on a mathematical theory. A relational database stores data in relations, which are tables, that store data in rows or tuples and columns or attributes. The relational database is based on the relational model and consists of a relational schema which contains the database objects. This course discusses what database and DBMSs are, the different database models and the database architectures. It also discusses what relational databases are, its components, and how relational databases were identified by Dr. Edgar Codd, including the 12 rules that were identified that a database should adhere to be considered relational.
  • recognize the differences between a database and a DBMS
  • recognize the different types of database users
  • identify the requirements of a good database
  • match the database architecture with its correct description
  • match the database model with its correct description
  • recognize the features of databases and DBMS
  • describe database models and database architectures
  • describe the features and recognize the types of relational databases
  • recognize how to model the database
  • describe how to outline a relationship database schema
  • describe the concept of referential integrity
  • recognize how to normalize the relations
  • describe relational database concepts
  • recognize the constructs in a relationship database schema
  • normalize database tables

Management of Relational Database Data

Database Management Systems, DBMSs, are used to control, maintain, and use a relational database where the data is stored. A relational database consists of the data records, files, and database objects. An important part of each organization is allowing users to gain access to the data for them to view and manipulated if required. In order for users to do this query languages are used which enable users to write queries and send them to the database to retrieve the appropriate data and return it to them. Queries can also be written to manipulate the data by updating, deleting or inserting it to the database. The Structured Query Language, known as SQL or SEQUEL, is the main query language used by most DBMSs, this is based on relational algebra and relational calculus which was developed by Dr. Edgar Codd for his theory for the relational database. This course discusses the relational algebra operations and relational calculus for a relational database, how to use SQL to manage data in a relational database, and how transactions and concurrency control are used to ensure data integrity and data consistency. It also discusses how security is implemented in a relational database to keep the data secure.
  • match each relational algebra operation with its correct description
  • recognize what the different SQL statements do
  • recognize the different relational algebra operations
  • recognize how to use SQL statements for queries and manipulation
  • recognize characteristics of transaction processing and concurrency control
  • recognize how a transaction works in a DBMS and describe the ANSI/ISO transaction model
  • recognize concurrency problems
  • recognize the fundamentals of locking
  • describe advanced locking techniques
  • recognize security concepts in a relational database
  • describe transaction processing and concurrency control
  • describe concurrency control with locking
  • describe security concepts in a relational database
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Database Fundamentals e-learning bundle
  • Course ID:
    252786
  • Duration:
    7 hours
  • Price:
    $169