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Course ID: 252435

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Six Sigma Black Belt (2007 BOK): Control

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Agenda

Ensuring a process is in control is critical to any Six Sigma project, but how do you determine with certainty if a process is on track or requires improvement? Where do you find the 'proof' or solid facts that a process is out of control and requires intervention? By applying statistical process control (SPC) methods, a Six Sigma team can identify and control variation in a process. This course covers the basic concepts in statistical process control methodology, including the selection of variables and rational subgrouping. One of the most important tools used in SPC methodology is the control chart, and this course explores how to select the right control chart for the variables being measured, and how to interpret specific patterns they reveal. This course is aligned with the ASQ Certified Six Sigma Black Belt certification exam and is designed to assist learners as part of their exam preparation. It builds on foundational knowledge that is taught in SkillSoft's ASQ-aligned Green Belt curriculum.
  • recognize the objectives of statistical process control (SPC)
  • recognize key concepts related to the use of SPC
  • recognize examples of variables that are good candidates for statistical process control
  • select the best option for rational subgrouping, in a given scenario
  • recognize the description of the rational subgrouping principle
  • identify considerations for determining appropriate subgroup size
  • use the appropriate control chart to determine upper and lower limits for a given process
  • recognize suitable applications for moving average charts
  • calculate moving averages
  • identify key concepts related to the use of short-run SPC charts
  • determine appropriate corrective actions for the trend exhibited in a given control chart
In the final stages of the Six Sigma DMAIC methodology, once process improvement opportunities are identified and implemented, teams need to control the improved processes in order to sustain improvement gains. Process control includes applying tools to continuously monitor and maintain each improved process, and to prevent it from reverting to its previous state. This course introduces basic nonstatistical control tools as well as tools for maintaining control so that process improvement initiatives continue as they were intended. Specifically, it explores how total productive maintenance (TPM) promotes shared responsibility for maintaining process gains, and how the visual factory provides at-a-glance information about process status, targets, and performance. In addition, this course highlights the need to re-analyze the measurement system after completing an improvement project, and provides guidelines for drawing conclusions from the re-analysis. It tours the key elements of a vital tool for maintaining controls – the control plan – and explores the steps for developing an effective plan. This course is aligned with the ASQ Certified Six Sigma Black Belt certification exam and is designed to assist learners as part of their exam preparation. It builds on foundational knowledge that is taught in SkillSoft's ASQ-aligned Green Belt curriculum.
  • recognize statements that reflect the goals and features of total productive maintenance (TPM)
  • sequence the steps recommended for implementing total productive maintenance (TPM)
  • sequence descriptions of the stages of small group development
  • use the overall equipment efficiency (OEE) calculation to evaluate the performance of a TPM company
  • recognize the basic goal of a sample element from a visual factory
  • recognize how various factors influence the decision to improve a measurement system in a given scenario
  • recognize the effect of reduced process variation on measurement system performance metrics
  • identify characteristics of a control plan
  • recognize examples of information typically included in a control plan
  • identify actions involved in transferring responsibility from the Six Sigma team to the process owner
As a Six Sigma project winds down, there are a number of activities that, if utilized, can determine whether the implemented process improvement will continue to meet intended results, thus contributing to the overall and ongoing success of the organization. This course will explore the importance of utilizing lessons learned from a Six Sigma project, and the role of training and documentation in sustaining support for Six Sigma improvements. Specifically, it will explore the use of a postmortem analysis, guidelines for developing training plans, and recommendations for delivering the training plan. Documentation such as manuals, work instructions, and standard operating procedures will be discussed, along with different measurement tools that can be used for ongoing evaluation of the improved process. This course is aligned with the ASQ Certified Six Sigma Black Belt certification exam and is designed to assist learners as part of their exam preparation. It builds on foundational knowledge that is taught in SkillSoft's ASQ-aligned Green Belt curriculum.
  • identify the overarching benefit of conducting a postmortem analysis in a Six Sigma project
  • determine what a Black Belt should have done differently in scheduling and selecting participants for a postmortem analysis, in a given scenario
  • identify the three categories of points to prepare for a postmortem session
  • recognize the key objectives of conducting and presenting the results of a postmortem
  • match examples of planning considerations to the aspect of training they help you to plan
  • identify elements that enhance communication in a training session
  • recognize examples of recommended presentation practices in a given training scenario
  • identify good practices associated with evaluating and following up on training
  • identify the characteristics of effective documentation
  • rank four types of documentation according to the documentation hierarchy
  • distinguish between types of documentation by recognizing examples of information suitable for each
  • recognize the best strategy for ongoing evaluation
Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) is the methodology associated with the design of a process, product, or service, which results in Six Sigma output that satisfies both the external customer and internal business requirements. DFSS is an innovative strategy for the design or redesign of a process, product, or service from the ground up. This course examines several of the common methodologies utilized in Design for Six Sigma (DFSS), beginning with the two common counterparts to the DMAIC methodology: DMADV and DMADOV. Design for X is emerging as an important knowledge-based multifunctional approach to design that is aimed at particular prioritized process constraints, such as cost, manufacturability, testability, or maintainability. This course explores several constraints in more detail, offering strategies for achieving designs concentrated on the chosen criteria. Another recently developed approach, robust design, uses parameter and tolerance control to produce designs which will be reliable during manufacturing and while in use. This course will address the basic aims of parameter control, tolerance design, and statistical tolerancing. This course is aligned with the ASQ Certified Six Sigma Black Belt certification exam and is designed to assist learners as part of their exam preparation. It builds on foundational knowledge that is taught in SkillSoft's ASQ-aligned Green Belt curriculum.
  • match new-product terms to examples
  • determine whether or not DFSS is appropriate for a given situation, and why
  • identify tools and approaches that are included in DFSS methodology
  • match the steps of the DMADOV methodology with the questions asked and activities performed in them
  • identify key requirements of a DFX initiative
  • identify the definition of Design for X (DFX)
  • match design for manufacturability and producibility strategies to examples of their practical implementation
  • recognize how to set and use target cost when designing for cost
  • recognize valid circumstances for readjusting a target cost
  • match DFX characteristics to associated strategies for design
  • identify the goals of robust design
  • use tolerance design calculations to determine tolerance specifications in a given scenario
  • distinguish between worst-case tolerancing and statistical tolerancing approaches
Six Sigma offers many techniques and strategies to improve an organization's processes. This course covers the strategic and tactical special design tools that can be utilized as a Six Sigma team designs products, processes, or services. Strategic special design tools like Porter's five forces model, portfolio architecting, and set-based design can be used to achieve breakthroughs in design problems that seem unsolvable. Tactical special design tools such as the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ), systematic design, critical parameter management, and Pugh analysis can provide a clear and concise way of identifying the root cause of poor designs. The tools then increase the quality of idea generation and problem solving. This course is aligned with the ASQ Certified Six Sigma Black Belt certification exam and is designed to assist learners as part of their exam preparation. It builds on foundational knowledge that is taught in SkillSoft's ASQ-aligned Green Belt curriculum.
  • match Porter's five forces with descriptions of their impact on organizations
  • identify the strategic characteristics of Porter's five forces model
  • match assessments of an organization's market position with the Porter's forces they represent
  • recognize examples of proactive strategies associated with an analysis of Porter's five forces
  • recognize the strategic goal of portfolio architecting
  • recognize examples of the elements of set-based design
  • sequence activities associated with a TRIZ approach to problem solving
  • identify how TRIZ benefits a DFSS initiative
  • recognize the structure of the conceptual phase of modern systematic design
  • recognize the key characteristics and benefits of critical parameter management
  • choose the best concept and take it into the next step of a Pugh analysis in a given scenario
  • identify key characteristics of Pugh analysis
  • sequence the steps in a Pugh analysis
Generally taken near the end of a program, Final Exam: Six Sigma Black Belt (2007 BOK): Control enables the learner to test their knowledge in a testing environment.
  • Topic T2 Objective O4
  • Topic T6 Objective O8
  • Topic T10 Objective O12
Generally taken near the end of a program, Final Exam: Six Sigma Black Belt (2007 BOK): Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) Frameworks and Methodologies enables the learner to test their knowledge in a testing environment.
  • Topic T2 Objective O4
  • Topic T6 Objective O8

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