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Course ID: 252692

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VMware: Datacenter Virtualization with vSphere 5 - Part 1

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Agenda

Ensuring High-Availability, fault tolerance, and business continuity is a key part of virtualization that is often overlooked or considered after the fact. In fact, it is as important as configuring storage devices and setting up virtual networking. There are multiple layers where vSphere administrators can help provide High-Availability in a variety of ways depending on the needs of the business and the unique requirements of the organization. Virtualization and VMware vSphere in particular enable new ways to provide High-Availability. A well known technique for achieving High-Availability at the operating system level is clustering. Server clusters, when constructed properly, provide automatic failover of services and applications hosted across multiple cluster nodes. This course will discuss clustering concepts and requirements as well as demonstrate how to create and edit a cluster. This course can be used in preparation for the VCP5 exam. However, it is not sponsored or authorized by VMware so does not fully satisfy the training requirements to achieve the certification.
  • recognize the benefits of clustering resources in a datacenter
  • identify recommended vSphere clustering limits
  • identify what needs to be considered when creating a basic cluster
  • recognize examples of cluster settings that can be changed
  • recognize actions for managing hosts assigned to a cluster
  • create a VSphere cluster and add hosts to it
High Availability (HA) is a popular feature within vSphere. In many cases, the lack of High Availability is the key argument used against virtualization. Many IT professionals believe that in a virtualized environment, the failure of a physical server will affect all the applications and workloads running on that server at the same time. VMware addresses this concern with a feature present in ESXi clusters: vSphere HA. In the event of complete server failure, vSphere HA provides an automated process for restarting the VMs that were running on an ESXi host at a time of the failure. Fault Tolerance (FT) is the evolution of continuous availability that works by utilizing VMware vLockstep technology to keep a primary machine and a secondary machine in a virtual lockstep. This virtual lockstep is based on the record/playback technology that VMware introduced in VMware Workstation in 2006. The vSphere FT process matches instruction for instruction and memory for memory to get identical results. This course discusses VMware Virtual Infrastructure High Availability options built in and available out of the box: vSphere HA and vSphere FT. These options help you provide better uptime for your critical applications. This course can be used in preparation for the VCP5 exam. However, it is not sponsored or authorized by VMware so does not fully satisfy the training requirements to achieve the certification.
  • identify key drivers of vSphere HA
  • recognize types of HA failure and failover scenarios
  • identify the purpose of HA admission control
  • determine appropriate admission control policy options, given a scenario
  • recognize HA settings that you can configure
  • recognize best practices for maintaining a healthy HA environment
  • configure HA for a given cluster
  • identify the features of Fault Tolerance
  • identify actions to take when enabling Fault Tolerance on a VM
  • recognize how FT impacts datastore components
  • differentiate between FT and HA capabilities
vSphere Distributed Resource Scheduler (DRS) builds on the idea of manually balancing loads across ESXi hosts and turns it into a way of automatically balancing resource utilization load across groups of ESXi hosts. DRS can be as automated as desired, and vCenter Server has ?exible controls for affecting the behavior of DRS as well as the behavior of specific VMs within a DRS-enabled cluster. This course describes the function of DRS and how to enable and edit DRS settings. vSphere DRS enables the use of Resource Pools when clustering ESXi hosts. Managing resource allocation and usage for large numbers of VMs creates too much administrative overhead and Resource Pools provide a mechanism for administrators to apply resource allocation policies to groups of VMs all at the same time. In much the same way as you assign users to groups and then assign permissions to the groups, you can leverage Resource Pools to make the allocation of resources to collections of VMs a more effective process. In other words, instead of configuring reservations, limits, or shares on a per VM basis, you can use a Resource Pool to set those values on a group of VMs all at once. This course explains how to create and manage Resource Pools to make the allocation of resources to collections of VMs more effective. vApps are a way for vSphere administrators to combine multiple VMs into a single unit. Why is this functionality useful? Increasingly, enterprise applications are no longer constrained to a single VM. Instead, enterprise applications may have components spread across multiple VMs. For example, a typical multitier application might have one or more front-end web servers, an application server, and a back-end database server. Although each of these servers is a discrete VM and could be managed as such, they are also part of a larger application that is servicing the organization. Combining these different VMs into a vApp allows the vSphere administrator to manage the different VMs as a single unit. This course explains how to work with vApps, including creating vApps and editing vApps. This course can be used in preparation for the VCP5 exam. However, it is not sponsored or authorized by VMware so does not fully satisfy the training requirements to achieve the certification.
  • describe the functions and requirements of DRS
  • identify the options available when enabling and editing DRS cluster settings
  • describe how to modify DRS cluster settings for a given scenario
  • describe how specific information is accessed using DRS
  • use resource pools to manage objects in a given scenario
  • describe the features of Resource Pools
  • describe the options available when creating and editing Resource Pools
  • configure DRS, Reservations, and Resource Pools
  • identify the characteristics of virtual applications
  • describe how virtual applications operate
The idea that we can take a single physical server and host many VMs has a great deal of value in today's dynamic datacenter environments. However, there are limits to how many VMs can run on a VMware ESXi host. The key to making the most of your virtualization platform is to understand how key resources such as memory and processors are consumed by the VMs running on the host and how the host itself consumes resources. One of the most significant advantages of server virtualization is the ability to allocate resources to a VM based on the machine's actual performance needs. This course explains how processor and memory are utilized and how vSphere resources are managed in a virtual environment. This course can be used in preparation for the VCP5 exam. However, it is not sponsored or authorized by VMware so does not fully satisfy the training requirements to achieve the certification.
  • recommend appropriate configurations for given virtualized processors
  • recommend power policy settings for a given host
  • match memory management methods with corresponding descriptions
  • identify considerations when overcommitting a host's memory capacity
  • identify strategies for ensuring optimal VM utilization within a cluster
  • recognize the benefits of managing resources
  • recognize how vSphere uses to allocate resources
  • use mechanisms to manage resource allocation
  • identify how to view and edit shares, reservations, and limits for a VM
  • recognize the process for editing shares, reservations, and limits for a VM
  • describe the benefits of using the Resource Allocation tab to edit resources
vCenter Server provides some useful new features for monitoring your VMs and hosts. Expanded performance views and charts, and increased numbers and types of alarms available by default make it much easier to manage and monitor VMware vSphere performance and ensures that the administrator is not caught unaware of performance issues or lack of capacity. The monitoring of VMware vSphere should be a combination of proactive benchmarking and reactive alarm-based actions and vCenter Server provides both methods to help the administrator keep tabs on each of the VMs and hosts as well as the hierarchical objects in the inventory. vMA (vSphere Management Assistant) is a VM, built upon a Linux distribution, that comes prepackaged with several software solutions such as the vSphere CLI and the vSphere SDK for Perl. When using the vMA, an administrator can run scripts or other software which interacts with ESXi hosts and the vCenter Server. This course describes the vCenter Server tools such as performance charts, monitoring, alarms, vMA, and resxtop that are used to monitor, manage, and mitigate the various objects within the vSphere environment. This course can be used in preparation for the VCP5 exam. However, it is not sponsored or authorized by VMware so does not fully satisfy the training requirements to achieve the certification.
  • describe the characteristics of statistics intervals
  • match the metric level to its function
  • identify what needs to be considered when creating a performance chart
  • describe how performance charts can be customized
  • describe the considerations involved in monitoring specific host activities and performance
  • monitor and view host performance in a given scenario
  • describe how alarms can be configured in vCenter Server
  • recognize how to manage alarms in vCenter Server
  • describe how health statistics for a host are obtained
  • identify vMA installation requirements
  • describe the vMA installation process
  • describe vMA configuration
  • add target servers to a vMA
  • describe the resxtop utility
  • install and configure vMA and use the resxtop utility in a given scenario

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